Articles Tagged with Legend Securities

shutterstock_145368937Investment attorneys at Gana Weinstein LLP are investigating customer complaints filed with The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) against Joseph Thurnherr (Thurnherr) alleging unsuitable investments, fraud, churning, breach of fiduciary duty, and unauthorized trading among other claims.  According to brokercheck records Thurnherr has been subject to five customer complaints, and one judgment/lien.

In November 2014, Thurnherr received a tax lien in the amount of $27,663.  A broker’s inability to handle their personal finances has also been found to be relevant in helping investors determine if they should allow the broker to handle their finances.

In June 2016 a customer filed a complaint alleging that Thurnherr overconcentrated their account causing $93,624 in losses.  The claim is currently pending.

shutterstock_101456704Investment attorneys at Gana Weinstein LLP are investigating customer complaints filed with The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) against John Cangialosi (Cangialosi) alleging unsuitable investments, fraudulent and negligent acts, breach of contractual requirements, churning, and negligent misrepresentation among other claims.  According to brokercheck records Cangialosi has been subject to five customer complaints, two financial disclosure – one bankruptcy and one tax liens, one employment separation for cause, and two regulatory events.

In April 2013, FINRA found that Cangialosi violated FINRA rules that require the timely disclosure judgments or liens.  In this case FINRA found that Cangialosi failed to timely disclose six liens and fined him $5,000 and suspended Cangialosi for three months.  In January 2016 the state of Michigan denied Cangialosi’s application to engage in securities business in the state on the grounds that Cangialosi engaged in dishonest and unethical practices within the last 10 years supporting the denial of his registration application.

In 2009 J.P. Turner & Company, LLC permitted Cangialosi to resign after allegations were made that the broker engaged in unauthorized trading in a client’s account.

shutterstock_93851422The securities fraud lawyers of Gana Weinstein LLP are investigating customer complaints filed with The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s (FINRA) against broker Caeron McClintock (McClintock).  According to BrokerCheck records McClintock has been the subject of at least two customer complaints and two judgements or liens.  The customer complaints against McClintock allege a number of securities law violations including that the broker made unsuitable investments, unauthorized trading, and churning (excessive trading) among other claims.

The most recent complaint was filed in August 2016 and alleged unauthorized trading causing $17,000 in damages.  The complaint is currently pending.  In December 2015 another investor filed a similar complaint and alleged negligence, misrepresentation, and churning causing $50,000 in damages.  The complaint is currently pending

When brokers engage in excessive trading, sometimes referred to as churning, the broker will typical trade in and out of securities, sometimes even the same stock, many times over a short period of time.  Often times the account will completely “turnover” every month with different securities.  This type of investment trading activity in the client’s account serves no reasonable purpose for the investor and is engaged in only to profit the broker through the generation of commissions created by the trades.  Churning is considered a species of securities fraud.  The elements of the claim are excessive transactions of securities, broker control over the account, and intent to defraud the investor by obtaining unlawful commissions.  A similar claim, excessive trading, under FINRA’s suitability rule involves just the first two elements.  Certain commonly used measures and ratios used to determine churning help evaluate a churning claim.  These ratios look at how frequently the account is turned over plus whether or not the expenses incurred in the account made it unreasonable that the investor could reasonably profit from the activity.

shutterstock_94632238In May 2016 the Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a five-count indictment in New York against nine defendants including Jared Mitchell, the Managing Partner of Mitchell & Sullivan Capital LLC; Richard Brown, a registered broker with Chelsea Financial Services; Christopher Castaldo, the Chief Executive Officer of Stock Traders Press Inc. and the President of Wall Street Buy Sell Hold Inc.; Gerald Cocuzzo, also known as “Gerry,” a registered broker formerly with Newbridge Securities Corporation; Naveed Khan, also known as “Nick,” a registered broker formerly with Meyers Associates, L.P.; Herschel Knippa III, also known as “Tres,” the owner and Head Trader at Kenai Capital Management LLC; Maroof Miyana, a registered broker formerly with Legend Securities; Pranav Patel, a registered broker formerly with Dawson James Securities; and Louis Petrossi, the founder and Chief Executive Officer of the Wealth Research Institute.

The DOJ’s charges involve the unlawful sale and activity related to stock ForceField Energy Inc. (ForceField), a publicly-traded company under the ticker symbol “FNRG.”  The charges include securities fraud, conspiracy to commit securities fraud, wire fraud, money laundering and making a false statement to law enforcement officials in connection with the fraudulent market manipulation of the stock.

The DOJ alleged that the defendants employed of scheme together with dishonest registered brokers to perpetrate an elaborate but fraudulent scheme built on lies, kickbacks and manipulated trading activity.  The defendants essentially used a company with no business operations and little revenue and deceived the market and their clients into believing it was worth hundreds of millions of dollars through unauthorized trades and deceptive promotions.

shutterstock_177231071The securities lawyers of Gana Weinstein LLP are investigating customer complaints filed with The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) against broker Peyton Jackson (Jackson).  According to BrokerCheck records Jackson has been subject to at least eleven customer complaints.  The customer complaints against Jackson allege securities law violations that including unsuitable investments, fraud, misrepresentation, negligence, and violations of industry rules among other claims.  Many of the complaints involve equities and private placements.

In addition, in April 2016, FINRA settled a regulatory action against Jackson alleging that he failed to disclose certain outside business activities and an outside brokerage account to his employing brokerage firms. According to FINRA, Jackson failed to disclose in writing to his firms that he offered investment banking, investor relations, commercial marketing, and Eastern Europe business development services through an outside entity that he controlled, received compensation for insurance services from another outside entity, and served as a successor trustee on behalf of a third party outside entity. FINRA also determined that Jackson failed to disclose to his firms the existence of a brokerage account that he opened in the name of an outside business entity owned by and controlled by him.

Brokers have a responsibility treat investors fairly which includes obligations such as making only suitable investments for the client.  In order to make a suitable recommendation the broker must meet certain requirements.  First, there must be reasonable basis for the recommendation the product or security based upon the broker’s investigation and due diligence into the investment’s properties including its benefits, risks, tax consequences, and other relevant factors.  Second, the broker then must match the investment as being appropriate for the customer’s specific investment needs and objectives such as the client’s retirement status, long or short term goals, age, disability, income needs, or any other relevant factor.

shutterstock_132704474The securities fraud lawyers of Gana Weinstein LLP are investigating customer complaints filed with The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s (FINRA) against broker Michael Androulakis (Androulakis).  According to BrokerCheck records Androulakis has been the subject of at least three customer complaints.  The customer complaints against Androulakis allege a number of securities law violations including that the broker made unsuitable investments, breach of fiduciary duty, and churning (excessive trading) among other claims.

One complaint filed in April 2015 alleged $134,350 in damages due to unsuitable recommendations and churning.  The complaint is currently pending.

When brokers engage in excessive trading, sometimes referred to as churning, the broker will typical trade in and out of securities, sometimes even the same stock, many times over a short period of time.  Often times the account will completely “turnover” every month with different securities.  This type of investment trading activity in the client’s account serves no reasonable purpose for the investor and is engaged in only to profit the broker through the generation of commissions created by the trades.  Churning is considered a species of securities fraud.  The elements of the claim are excessive transactions of securities, broker control over the account, and intent to defraud the investor by obtaining unlawful commissions.  A similar claim, excessive trading, under FINRA’s suitability rule involves just the first two elements.  Certain commonly used measures and ratios used to determine churning help evaluate a churning claim.  These ratios look at how frequently the account is turned over plus whether or not the expenses incurred in the account made it unreasonable that the investor could reasonably profit from the activity.

shutterstock_19864066The securities fraud lawyers of Gana Weinstein LLP are investigating customer complaints filed with The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s (FINRA) against broker Bernardo Misseri (Misseri).  According to BrokerCheck records Misseri has been the subject of at least seven customer complaints, five judgements or liens, and two regulatory actions.  The customer complaints against Misseri allege a number of securities law violations including that the broker made unsuitable investments, unauthorized trading, fraud, misrepresentations, and churning (excessive trading) among other claims.  In addition, there are two regulatory claims against Misseri.  One by the state of Illinois filed in June 2010 that suspended the broker for two years.  Another action was filed by the NASD in 2005 alleging that Misseri effected private securities transactions away from his firm by soliciting certain limited partnerships.

Misseri has disclosed several large tax liens including a $6,746 in March 2015, a tax lien of $7,662 in February 2015, a $37,847 tax lien in November 2014, a $11,884 tax lien in June 2014, and a $217,156 tax lien in August 2013.  Substantial judgements and liens on a broker’s record can reveal a financial incentive for the broker to recommend high commission products or services.  A broker’s inability to handle their personal finances has also been found to be relevant in helping investors determine if they should allow the broker to handle their finances.

When brokers engage in excessive trading, sometimes referred to as churning, the broker will typical trade in and out of securities, sometimes even the same stock, many times over a short period of time.  Often times the account will completely “turnover” every month with different securities.  This type of investment trading activity in the client’s account serves no reasonable purpose for the investor and is engaged in only to profit the broker through the generation of commissions created by the trades.  Churning is considered a species of securities fraud.  The elements of the claim are excessive transactions of securities, broker control over the account, and intent to defraud the investor by obtaining unlawful commissions.  A similar claim, excessive trading, under FINRA’s suitability rule involves just the first two elements.  Certain commonly used measures and ratios used to determine churning help evaluate a churning claim.  These ratios look at how frequently the account is turned over plus whether or not the expenses incurred in the account made it unreasonable that the investor could reasonably profit from the activity.

shutterstock_175137287The securities and investment attorneys of Gana Weinstein LLP are interested in speaking with clients of Arthur “Mel” Coffey (Coffey). According to the BrokerCheck records kept by Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Coffey has been the subject of at least 13 customer complaints, 2 judgments or liens, and 1 criminal matter. The customer complaints against Coffey allege a number of securities law violations including that the broker made unsuitable investments, engaged in churning (excessive trading), misrepresentations, negligence, fraud, and unauthorized trading other claims.

Coffey entered the securities industry in 1994. From October 2008, through May 2013, Coffey was associated with John Thomas Financial (John Thomas). Thereafter in March 2015, Coffey was registered with Tryco Securities, Inc. Finally, Coffey became associated with Legend Securities, Inc. in March 2015 out of the firm’s Miller Place, New York office location. Coffey’s former employer John Thomas, was run by Anastasios “Tommy” Belesis who recently agreed to be banned from the securities industry when the SEC accused him of defrauding investors in two hedge funds. In addition, John Thomas faced allegations of penny-stock fraud by FINRA after the firm reaped more than $100 million in commissions over its six-year history before it closed in July. According to new sources trainees at the firm earned as little as $300 a week to pitch stocks with memorized scripts.

In addition, almost all of the complaints against Coffey involve claims of churning. When brokers engage in churning the broker will typical trade in and out of securities, sometimes even the same stock, many times over a short period of time. Often times the account will completely “turnover” every month with different securities. This type of investment trading activity in the client’s account serves no reasonable purpose for the investor and is engaged in only to profit the broker through the generation of commissions created by the trades.

shutterstock_115937266According to the BrokerCheck records kept by Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) broker Salvatore Pizzimenti (Pizzimenti) has been the subject of at least 4 customer complaints. Customers have filed complaints against Pizzimenti alleging securities law violations including claims of churning and excessive trading, unsuitable investments, excessive commissions, unauthorized trading, breach of fiduciary duty, and fraud among other claims. In 2013, a customer complained that Pizzimenti churned their account causing $500,000 in damages. In August 2012, another customer also complained that Pizzimenti recommended a high risk private placement and also charged excessive fees causing $1,000,000 in damages.

Pizzimenti entered the securities industry in 2004. From January 2007, until January 2009, Pizzimenti was registered with Pointe Capital, Inc. From January 2009, until February 2010, Pizzimenti was associated with National Securities Corporation. From February 2010, until August 2011, Pizzimenti was a registered representative of J.P. Turner & Company, L.L.C. Since August 2011, Pizzimenti has been associated with Legend Securities, Inc. out of the firm’s New York, New York office location.

All advisers have a fundamental responsibility to deal fairly with investors including making suitable investment recommendations. In order to make suitable recommendations the broker must have a reasonable basis for recommending the product or security based upon the broker’s investigation of the investments properties including its benefits, risks, tax consequences, and other relevant factors. In addition, the broker must also understand the customer’s specific investment objectives to determine whether or not the specific product or security being recommended is appropriate for the customer based upon their needs.

shutterstock_85873471According to the BrokerCheck records kept by Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) broker John Lopinto (Lopinto) has been the subject of at least two customer complaints. The customer complaints against Lopinto allege securities law violations that claim churning and excessive trading, unsuitable investments, excessive commissions, breach of fiduciary duty, and fraud among other claims.  One complaint alleged that Lopinto caused $4,000,000 in damages. In another claim filed the customer alleged $1,000,000 in damages as a result of high risk private placements and account churning.

Lopinto entered the securities industry in 2002. From January 2007 until January 2009, Lopinto was associated with Pointe Capital, Inc. From January 2009 until February 2010, Lopinto was associated with National Securities Corporation. Thereafter, from February 2010, until August 2011, Lopinto was associated with J.P. Turner & Company, L.L.C. Finally, since August 2011 onward Lopinto has been associated with Legend Securities, Inc. out of the firm’s New York, New York office location.

Churning is investment trading activity in the client’s account that serves no reasonable purpose for the investor and is transacted solely to profit the broker. The elements to establish a churning claim, which is considered a species of securities fraud, are excessive transactions of securities, broker control over the account, and intent to defraud the investor by obtaining unlawful commissions. A similar claim, excessive trading, under FINRA’s suitability rule involves just the first two elements. Certain commonly used measures and ratios used to determine churning help evaluate a churning claim. These ratios look at how frequently the account is turned over plus whether or not the expenses incurred in the account made it unreasonable that the investor could reasonably profit from the activity.